Fish Balls Recipe

fish-balls

Fish balls are popular street food in the Philippines. Fish balls are a common food in southern China and overseas Chinese communities made from surimi. They are also common in Scandinavia, where they are usually made from cod or haddock

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Fish Balls RECIPE AND VIDEO

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Banana Cake Recipe

banana-cake

Banana bread is a type of bread that uses yellow bananas as the main ingredient. Unlike traditional breads, this sweet bread that is sometimes referred to as banana cake (although this is a different thing which we will feature soon) uses baking soda as leavening agent instead of yeast. The recipe that we have here will enable you to make a loaf of moist banana bread. Aside from the good taste, this recipe also costs low. This can be a potential income source for our business-minded kababayans.

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Banana Cake RECIPE AND VIDEO

Sago’t Gulaman Recipe

sagot-gulaman

Sago’t Gulaman is a very popular refreshment in the Philippines. It is basically sago (tapioca pearls) and gulaman (jelly) in caramelized sugar with lots of ice. In restaurants, it is served in a tall, footed glass…and in the street stalls, it is ladled into plastic cups or plastic bags with straw. It can be an after-meal beverage-dessert, a snack or simply a drink.

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Sago’t Gulaman RECIPE AND VIDEO

Kwek Kwek (Tokneneng) Recipe

kwek-kwek

Tokneneng, a famous Tempura-like Filipino street food, made by deep-frying orange batter covered hard-boiled eggs. A popular variation of Tokneneng is Kwek-kwek. The main difference between the two lies in the egg that is used. Tokneneng is traditionally made with chicken or duck eggs, while Kwek-kwek is made with quail eggs or “itlog ng pugo”. Due to their similarities, the two are often confused with some people calling Tokneneng “kwek kwek” and vice versa. Tokneneng is usually served with a spiced vinegar-based dip.

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Kwek Kwek (Tokneneng) RECIPE AND VIDEO

Sago Pudding Recipe

sago-pudding

Sago pudding is a sweet pudding made by boiling sago with either water or milk and adding sugar and sometimes additional flavourings. It is made in many cultures with varying styles, and may be produced in a variety of ways. In Malaysia, sago gula melaka is a sago pudding made by boiling pearl sago in water and serving it with syrup of palm sugar (gula melaka) and coconut milk. In the UK, “sago pudding” is generally made by boiling pearl sago and sugar in milk until the sago pearls become clear, and thickening it with eggs or cornflour. Depending on the proportions used it can range from a runny consistency to fairly thick, and can be similar to tapioca pudding or rice pudding.

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Sago Pudding RECIPE AND VIDEO

Sweet and Sour Pork Recipe

sweet-and-sour-pork

Sweet and sour pork is undisputedly one of China’s most famous dishes and exports. Of Cantonese origin, this winning combination of crispy and crunchy pork bites coated in a vibrant sweet and sour sauce has captured the appetitites of many both in and out of China. Sweet and sour sauce doesn’t have to be thick, gluggy and bright orange. This modern, light version allows the succulence of the meat and the fresh flavours and different textures of a variety of vegetables and noodles to shine through.

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Sweet and Sour Pork RECIPE AND VIDEO

Kinilaw Na Guso Recipe

kinilaw-na-guso

Guso (scientifically Eucheuma) is a type of seaweed very common in the Philippines especially in the Visayas region where it is most abundant. A very gelatinous, substantial seaweed and some prefer to blanch it for a few seconds before soaking it in vinegar and mixed with ginger, red bell pepper and tomato with some onion, its served cold. It tastes mainly of the dressing but the crunchy texture is really nice, similar to cucumber. It has a textural and mouth feel that is unlike most salads you have eaten before. This is best served with dried fish, rice and eaten with your hands. Stretch out your imaginations. Guso is found in most night food markets, not really something you’ll see at corner stalls though. And for additional info, this is mostly in demand in the domestic and export markets, which can be be farmed easily along the coastal areas of the country and it took more than 50 years for the Filipinos to unlock the hidden wonders of the seaweed thus it now plays a major role in the commercial world as being turned into carrageenan.

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Kinilaw Na Guso RECIPE AND VIDEO